Flowers

It is estimated that there are around 400,000 different species of flowering plants in the world, and the number is growing each year with advances in agricultural technology. Biologically, these gorgeous blooms are the reproductive structures of floral plants. More familiarly, however, flowers are admired for their beauty and fragrance. Through both history and modern times, flowers have been used for decoration at special events, and as romantic or congratulatory gifts. Growing flowers is a must for any home gardener; they breathe colorful life to all landscapes, and are often the stars of the show.

Astilbe
Atlas Poppy
Aztec Verbena
Black Eyed Susans
Black Knight Coleu
Blackberries
Blue Pea Vine
Blueberries
Borage
Bronze Pagoda Cole
Camellia
Candy Store Coleus
Clasping Leaf Cone
Coco Loco Coleus
Coleus
Crimson Clover
Crocuses
Daffodils
Dappled Apple Cole
Dark Star Coleus
Delphiniums
Dianthus
Dipped In Wine Col
Early Buttercup
Garland Flower
Gladiolus
Hoochie Coochie Hi
Hummingbird Sage
Hyacinths
Indian Blanket
Irises
Jewelweed
Johnny Jump-Up
Lace Flower
Lady In Red Salvia
Lanai Peach Verben
Larkspur
Lemon Drop Torenia
Lilacs
Lilies
Lion's Ear
Maple Sugar Hibisc
Mexican Sunflower
Pansies
Peonies
Perilla
Petunia
Phlox
Rapunsel Verbena
Rhododendrons
Sedum
Shasta Daisies
Snow Princess Alys
Snowball Alternant
Superbena Pink Sha
Temari Verbena
Texas Maroon Blueb
Tulips
Veronica
Viola
Wallflower
Wildfire Verbern S
Wishbone Flower
Wisteria
Yarrow
Zinnias


Flowers can be either annuals or perennials. Annuals complete their entire life cycles within one season, but generally bloom for the duration of the whole season. Perennials, however, continue to blossom for multiple years. Though perennial plants may appear dead or dying for part of the year, they are simply dormant while their root systems remain alive. These flowers may last for several years or even decades, but their seasonal blooms don't always last as long as those of annual varieties.

Different types of flowers obviously have different needs that should be considered when choosing the right types for your garden. Some require full sun, like tulips and petunias, while others prefer partial shade, like cardinal flowers. Still others do best in full shade or partial shade. Some flowers, like chrysanthemums, can excel in both exposures, making them versatile and usually ideal for keeping indoors.

Similarly, soil plays an important role in flowers' health. Most types grow best in well-drained soil, though some exceptions, like Angelonia and bee balm, prefer damp soil. Other species like periwinkle need dryer soil and some do well in soil of high fertility.

Another factor to include in your decision process is size. Some flowers remain under a foot tall at full maturity, while others can reach up to six feet. Some types make for better cut flowers than others, which is something to consider if you're planning on bringing your blooms indoors or creating beautifully original floral arrangements.

Like all plants, flowers require the proper environment to not only survive but to also reach their full potential. For this reason, it is crucial to learn your hardiness zone and which species are best suited for your region's climate. To do this quickly and easily, simply enter your zip code in the bottom menu. Or if you'd rather learn more about all recommended flower types, browse our selection below.