Trees

Trees are an incredibly prominent part of our everyday lives, and our relationship with them is crucial and inspiring. With an incredible 60,000 or more species, the task of choosing a tree to add to your home's landscape can be daunting. To simplify the process, it's best to get to know a little about trees and how they are categorized, while keeping in mind which characteristics you're looking for.

Trees are perennial plants, meaning they survive through the seasons and through the years. Some trees have even grown to be several thousand years old! They can be either evergreen, like magnolia and ficus, or deciduous, like maple and elm. From there, tree species can be further sorted by their intended uses. Trees can be cultivated for shade, fruits and nuts, lumber, or simply for their aesthetic value.

Arborvitae
Aspen
Banksia
Beech
Beech
Birch
Black Mangrove
Black Olive
Camphor
Catalpa
Cedar
Cherry
Cliftonia
Clown fig
Corktree
Corn stalk
Council tree
Crab
Cryptomeria
Cypress
Devil's Walkingsti
Dogwood
Douglas Fir
Elephant Tree
Elm
Eucalyptus
Fir
Fishtail Palm
Grapefruit
Gumbo-Limbo Tree
Hayata
Hazelnut
Hemlock
Hickory
Honeylocust
Hornbeam
Horsechestnut
Incense Cedar
Indian banyan
Ivy tree
Jamaican Caper
Juneberry
Juniper
Katsura tree
Laurel
Lemon
Lime
Magnolia
Mangrove
Maple
Mayhaw
Mimosa
Monkey gum
Neem Tree
Oak
Orchid Tree
Papaya
Pears
Pecan
Persimmon
Pine
Poplar
Redbud
River Birch
Royal Ponciana
Satinleaf
Sequoia
Serviceberry
Silk floss tree
Smoketree
Spruce
Tuliptree
Tung Oil Tree
Walnut
Weeping River Birc
Willow
Yellowwood


For all tree types, the suggested planting time is in the early spring after the last freeze has passed. Each species, however, has its own ideal growing conditions and maintenance routine. Keep in mind that it will take a few years before fruit or nut trees begin producing, so if you're starting to landscape a new property or if you just want to minimize wait time, these types of trees should be prioritized within your gardening process.

The list of tree varieties seems endless. Every American region fosters its own prominent tree types, which are naturally selected by the area's climate and conditions. For a healthy thriving tree, it's important to know which trees are best suited for your environment. For example, if you live in a very dry region, drought-resistant trees like Eastern red cedar and silver maple will be more likely to survive. Conversely, different types of poplars and cypress trees are among the few varieties that can sustain themselves in areas with very wet soil that are prone to water logging.

Whatever your intended use may be, trees are the anchors of the garden. They can shape and alter the entire look and design of your yard while simultaneously serving as food, shade, and fresh air providers. Luckily, the selection process can be made simple by searching for tree types according to their hardiness zones. Choose your state in the bottom menu to find which trees are best suited for your region's climate, or browse the list of all recommended tree varieties.